Wednesday, July 16, 2008

Aquatic plants in the compost and mulch in the garden

Aquatic Plants for MulchingOne of the problems I've run into is the need for manure or compost for the garden. Given how rushed the past three months have been I suppose I should be happy that the garden is doing as well as it is but I know it would be better had I gotten manure. I did get about a 30 gallon can worth of compost from my previous pile but that's not much. I have a source of horse manure about a mile away, I've just been waiting to hear that they have a pile and then I can arrange to go get some.

A couple days ago I had one of those AHA!! moments. Why not harvest and use some of the aquatic plants growing in the lake just 100 yards away? There's gobs of the stuff and it gets thicker each week. I'm fairly certain it would make a perfect high nitrogen compost and mulch material. So, the next major project will be harvesting many wheelbarrows of it and then set it out as the first layer in a mulch/compost bed for next year's corn plot. The bonus is that I can take care of this with no need for gas. I'll certainly get and use manure when I can, especially when the source is just a mile away, but if these fast growing aquatic plants work well then I expect they may serve as the primary nitrogen supplement for the garden and compost.




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1 comment:

  1. Back when I used to work on a farm that had some ponds, one of my jobs was to skim the algae off the surface when it got a bit out of control (in the summer, a few times a week on average). I used to fill buckets and buckets and used it for compost around. Although it's kinda heavy when wet, I learned to just pile it by the edge of the pond and pick it up when it dried out a few days later. Much easier! Since seaweed is really good for plants, I would imagine algae would be also.

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