Tuesday, March 14, 2006

Bush's Iran Lies

Truthdig has posted an excellent essay by Juan Cole regarding Iran:Fishing for a Pretext in Iran. This whole build-up certainly seems to be the same technique used to take the country into the obviously illegal war against Iraq. Truly amazing that this pack of war criminals, even as we watch the mess they created in Iraq, would attempt another aggression based on lies. Not just amazing, but a whole new level of disgusting and a continuation of U.S. terrorism. And yes, the corporate media is, as we would expect, going along with the lies. It's not just the Nuclear pretext either, as Cole points out in an update to his article, just yesterday (3/13) Bush is again trying to link the IEDs being used in Iraq with Iran. The administration has been doing this for many months and it's really just a part of the larger campaign.

From the article:
The Bush administration has arbitrarily taken the position that Iran may not have a nuclear research program at all, even a civilian one. This stance actually contradicts the guarantees of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Washington officials continually intimate to the press that Tehran has an active weapons program, which is speculation. And, of course, the United States itself is egregiously in violation of several articles of the NPT, keeping enough nuclear weapons on hair-trigger alert to destroy the world several times over and actively pursuing new and deadly weapons, even dreaming of “tactical” nukes. Its ally in the region, Israel, never signed the NPT and was helped by the British to get a bomb in the 1960s.

The U.S. National Intelligence Estimate released in summer 2005 estimates that if Iran did have an active nuclear weapons program, and if the international atmosphere were favorable to it being able to get hold of the requisite equipment, it would still be a good 10 years away from a bomb. But the international atmosphere is actively hostile to such a development, and anyway it has not been proved that there is such a weapons program.
...

The answer is that the Iranian nuclear issue is déjà vu all over again. As it did with regard to the Baath regime in Iraq, the militarily aggressive Bush administration wants to overthrow the government in Tehran. Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, now in a coma, urged the U.S. to hit Iran as soon as it had taken care of Saddam Hussein. The Israelis have a grudge against it because it helped end their military occupation and land grab in southern Lebanon by giving aid to the Shiite Hezbollah organization, the only Arab force ever to succeed in regaining occupied land from Israel by military means. But Iran does not form a conventional military threat to Israel.

Overthrowing the theocratic regime in Iran, Washington hopes, would reduce Hezbollah pressure on Israel over its continued occupation of the Shebaa Farms area (and, implicitly, the Golan Heights). It would make Syria more complaisant toward Israel and Washington. It would open up Iran to investment and exploration on the part of the American petroleum majors, which are at the moment excluded because the U.S. slapped an economic boycott on Iran. It might remove support for the more hard-line elements among Shiite political parties in Iraq, making that country easier for the U.S. to shape and dominate. In short, a U.S.-installed regime in Iran would hold out the promise of returning to the halcyon 1960s, when the shah was an American puppet in the region.

The nuclear issue is for the most part a pretext for the Americans to exert pressure on the regime in Tehran. This is not to say that proliferation is not a worrisome issue, or that it can be ruled out that Iran wants a bomb. It is to say that the situation simply has not reached the point of crisis, and therefore other motivations must be sought for the Bush administration’s breathless rhetoric.

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2 comments:

  1. You hit the nail on the head in regards to the corporate media. It is always the media, in every country (Australia is the same), who are the disseminators of the lies created by the government. The majority of the population seem to swallow anything this media feeds to them, and if they cough it back up, it's already too late, thousands of lives already lost. So the problem I see is a) The media and its circulation of lies, and b) The public who believe it. As long as these two factors are maintained, I guess any corrupt government's attitude would be, 'Hey, if it works, why not?'
    As long as the media is pardoned and the people remain gullible from it, I can't see any government relying on these factors, being brought to justice. It would be great to see some pre-emptive action by the people, rather than them wait for genocide to occur and then frown and say 'Gee, what a bad thing. We were wrong to believe Bush.'

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  2. hey aketus,

    yeah, the media really is key isn't it? of course it does not help that, at least here in the states, socialization generally pushes people into a passive, non-critical role geared towards consumption... starts at an early age and is reinforced by public "education"...

    bush and his war criminals know that it will have to get far, far worse before the people rebel. i seriously doubt there will be a presidential election in 2008. i'll be blogging those thoughts further.

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