Sunday, December 04, 2005

Climate Change: Atlantic Circulation slowing, increased hurricane season, less snow in Arctic Tundra

Stuart Staniford over at The Oil Drum has posted an excellent discussion regarding the recently released studies about the Atlantic Circulation Changes:
Nature today reports a new study by Bryden et al. suggesting a significant slowdown in the North Atlantic circulation (tip of hat to Westexas). The emphasis in coverage has been on the implications of cooling for Europe. For example, The New Scientist says
The ocean current that gives western Europe its relatively balmy climate is stuttering, raising fears that it might fail entirely and plunge the continent into a mini ice age. The dramatic finding comes from a study of ocean circulation in the North Atlantic, which found a 30% reduction in the warm currents that carry water north from the Gulf Stream. The slow-down, which has long been predicted as a possible consequence of global warming, will give renewed urgency to intergovernmental talks in Montreal, Canada, this week on a successor to the Kyoto Protocol.
The New Scientist is a UK publication, and this is scary stuff for a country that's running out of natural gas, oil, and coal. But let's just have a quick think about the implications for hurricanes and oil supply.
Hurricane Seasons

It's worth your time as are the comments following the post. Of course I'd also suggest the articles referenced though the Nature article requires a purchase or subscription.

Climate Change: could it be more obvious? You know, perhaps it will stop snowing in the Arctic tundra? Would that be obvious enough? Bush and the U.S. congress will likely continue in the wrong direction and the people of the world will continue to protest in support of Kyoto.

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